Well it’s been a while, but something occurred this weekend where I live that compelled me back to my blog. If I tell you that I moved from London to Toronto a while back, I’m sure you’ll guess what I’m referring to (if the headline hasn’t given it away already). Firstly I want to talk about my own personal experience. I went to participate in the major rally and march from Queen’s Park (the provincial legislature) on Saturday. I’m not currently officially part of any political grouping or organisation, although I do lean left, as I’m sure you’ve gathered from previous posts. I arrived a little apprehensively on a wet day and fell in with the Amnesty International group – it seemed a safe place to be and I have been an Amnesty member previously.

After a number of speeches we headed off south along University Avenue, a vast mass of many thousands seeking to have our voices heard. The first moment of tension occurred as we passed the US consulate, which was barricaded off with crush barriers and surrounded by police in full riot gear, but I guess that was to be expected. Upon seeing a camera on the roof, one protestor jokingly said “smile for the CIA database”. At Queen Street, we started heading west, and were suddenly accompanied by a lone bagpiper. We passed police cordons blocking all southbound streets but moved on without incident. At one point two women sitting at their apartment windows starting banging frying pans in support, to great cheers.

We continued north on Spadina to College and then returned to Queen’s Park, at which point I left, happy that the march had passed off incident-free and that, at the very least, so many people had turned out in inclement weather in Canada, where people don’t protest like those in countries like France, to raise their voice against the impending economic attacks on those who didn’t cause the financial crisis, as deficit reduction becomes the name of the game. And then I got home and saw what had happened after I had left…I’m sure by now you have all viewed the images of burning cars, broken windows, riot police, black-clad rioters and mass arrests as Toronto lost an element of its innocence. The finger-pointing will probably start immediately but to my mind there’s plenty of blame to go around…

Firstly to the “Anarchists” who just smash stuff up: STOP IT, JUST STOP IT!!! You are not expressing political outrage, you are just indulging vainglorious revolutionary fantasies and are not helping in the slightest. This was a chance for the good people of Canada to lay out their desires for a better world and maybe start to build something significant, even if we couldn’t get to the fence, and you ruined it as you always do. And by the way, you’re not anarchists – anarchism is a group of complicated theories of how to organise society’s resources. For you, it merely means smashing windows.

Next, to the rest of the protest movement – it’s time to cut these groups off completely – they harm your causes constantly. No longer should they be tacitly welcomed at protest marches – only those totally committed to peaceful means should be allowed.

It’s probably too early to comment on much of the incidents involving police actions but there are a couple of things I would like to say to Bill Blair and the boys in blue: firstly when you say that you want to facilitate the right of people to protest peacefully, you are being incredibly disingenuous. When you put up a huge security fence around an event and then keep protestors miles from it you render that protest utterly impotent. When you line the route with police in full riot gear, you intimidate away many.  And when you put a line of police at the point when the march turned onto Queen Street, you prevented the troublemakers from breaking away from the main march, a tactic that could have led to disaster. And at times, the assembled force has looked like it was getting ready for an invading army, not a rag-tag group of punks who, at worst, were going to smash a few windows…but hey, I guess you have to justify that Billion-dollar security budget.

To the media, I know you totally get off on the scenes of violence, but could you not have shown even a few decent shots of the vastness of the main march, rather than that burning police car from the umpteenth angle? FFS, we walked right outside CP24’s studios on Queen Street West – you didn’t even have to go anywhere-just stick a camera on the balcony. Although by the end of the weekend, poor Lisa LaFlamme looked so drained and frustrated (especially when her cameraman was arrested) that I thought she was ready to go all John Pilger (look him up) on us.

And finally to the World Leaders, for whose benefit this all unfolded, it would have been nice if you at least acknowledged our existence – maybe even explained why you are not going to implement the policies we called for…


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Comments
  1. Mary Donnery says:

    …I myself am a Torontonian and am still in shock over the recents events in what is normally a peaceful and tolerant city. While violence, in my opinion solves nothing, I also believe peoples voices should be heard. It’s unfortunate that these voices were overshadowed by a few selfish attention seekers…what was their point?

  2. Between the hotheads smashing windows and the police smashing heads, social change and justice dies a slow death.

  3. Smashing things can be valuable as part of a direct action tactic. Breaking windows is not violence against living creatures and should not be confused with such.

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